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How to make money in China – Shaun Rein

Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explained at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondents Club how foreign companies become winners and losers in China. The “methodical, systematic plan” to garner support for the One Belt, One Road initiative was the result of a “divide and conquer” strategy on the part of the Chinese government, he said.

How Starbucks conquered a tea-drinking nation – Tom Doctoroff

Starbucks opened its largest outlet last week in Shanghai, and is moving from US to China as its largest operation. Marketing guru Tom Doctoroff looks at the strategy of the US coffee retailer who entered a tea-drinking nation, and gained tracking few foreign companies got, he explains in IdealsShanghai. “A Houdini act of Marketing”.

Bike-sharing: only at the start of their development – Jeffrey Towson

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

Management skills needed for China’s outbound investments – Shaun Rein

One of the key barriers in China’s massive outbound investment programs, like One Belt, One Road (OBOR) is the lack of management talents, tells author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order on the Human Resources page at LinkedIn. “Private Chinese companies have the capital and will pay for consulting services, especially companies in the tech sector.”

Why Tim Cook kowtowed to China – Shaun Rein

Apple removed many VPN’s from its Chinese app store, and CEO Tim Cook joined China’s internet propaganda show last week. Author Shaun Rein of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explains in ChinaFile why Tim Cook got an audience in Wuzhen, and Google’s Sundar Pichai not.

Will bike-share firms merge? Not yet – Jeffrey Towson

Will Mobike and Ofo, China’s largest bike-sharing companies merge, like car-sharing firm did in the past? Not yet, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson. International expansions goes well, capital is freely available, and a crippling price war has not yet emerged, he argues.

“The War for China’s Wallets” now available – Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein’s long-awaited new book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order is now available at Amazon and possible a bookstore near you. “This book covers more geopolitics than my previous two books and looks at how China is cementing its power through economic carrots/ initiatives like One Belt One Road and by punishing countries like Norway and companies like Lotte that do not follow its wants politically. The book looks at how China is dealing with Southeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula, the Middle East, and how the US needs to respond,” he writes at the publisher’s website. 

The long-term effects of China’s religious revival – Ian Johnson

Religious persecution in China is high on the political agenda, but most people do not see how the country’s religious revival is going to change our relations in the long run, argues journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao at the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.

Ranking international schools in China – Rupert Hoogewerf

International schools are big business in China, not only for expat families living in China, but increasingly also for ambitious Chinese. Rupert Hoogewerf, chief researcher of the Hurun China Rich List ranked those schools for the first time at Hurun Education. YK PAO school, International School of Beijing, Dulwich College Beijing and Keystone Academy lead the top international schools in China, the report says

China: A fast changing society – Zhang Lijia

Stability is the key word for China’s political leaders, but when author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China looks back at her last thirty years for her life, she sees a unbelievable change, she tells in a wide-ranging interview in the Australian Financial Review.

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