The number of rich Chinese families has dropped, although only slightly, says this year’s Hurun Wealth Report, according to the China Daily. Both a dropping economy and the trade war triggered off the effect, says Rupert Hoogewerf, chairman of the Hurun Report, now in its 11th year.

Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from New World Order and other bestsellers on doing business in China, explains how he can stay ahead of the China trends.

Alipay and WeChat, China’s largest payment options, opened their services for foreign credit card holders, and it was about time too, says Shanghai-based business analyst Shaun Rein, author of the bestseller The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from New World Order to the South China Morning Post. The South China MorningRead More →

Understanding the consumer in China is tough for most foreign companies entering this competitive market, says retail analyst Ben Cavender. There is no escape from shopping here, as retail is fully integrated into daily life. “China is where all the future trends are happening,” he says.

China veteran Shaun Rein explains at the WSJ Tech Live conference how the policies of US President Donald Trump help China companies to focus on their own innovation instead of buying technology in the US.

Three Chinese companies, Ant Financial, Didi Chuxing and Bytedance top the inaugural global unicorn list 2019 for startups in this century, says Hurun chief researcher Rupert Hoogewerf according to the CEO Magazine.

China’s big cities are developing a new city life, including new identities, writes journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, at the opening chapter of, Shanghai Sacred: The Religious Landscape of a Global City, by photographer and anthropologist Liz Hingley, quoted in a review of the photo exhibition in Liverpool at Creative Boom

China’s competitive landscape is changing fast, and the blooming incubators for startups offer multinational a much-needed edge in local competition, says William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccellator in Shanghai to Forbes. “When you’re under pressure and local players are taking market share from you, you look to innovation.”

The effects of a slowdown in China’s economy on foreign companies might vary, on the industry they are working in and on their size, says Shanghai-based business analyst Ben Cavender to Reuters. Smaller firms might close down, while larger ones try to diversify over time, he adds.