China’ struggle against the coronavirus has been on the front pages worldwide on the past weeks. Western CEO’s of companies with operations in China have been calling for calm and try to convince their audiences all is well for those operations. The question is whether that is more than wishful thinking.

China has been into lunar festival mode over the past weeks and all offices and factories would have been closed anyway. Damage might have been obvious in the consumer industry as even outside Wuhan many inhabitants kept off the streets. But the major question is now, as the lunar festival holidays end, whether China’s massive work force returns to their workplaces.

US President Donald Trump wants US companies to fight China, but they rather flee for greener pastures not to their home countries, says financial analyst Sara Hsu at the ChinaUSFacus. But some might decide to swap countries too early, she warns.

One of the purposes of Trump’s trade war is convincing US companies to leave China. But they are not yet ready to move, says economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, in the Channel News Asia. And when they move, they might before countries like Vietnam over the US, he adds.

Western media have been portraying China’s massive investment program One Belt, One Road (OBOR) or Belt Road Initiative (BRI) as a colonial trick to put developing countries into debt, and then seize their assets. Business analyst Andy Mok sees debt problems as a normal business risk in highly complicated investments on infrastructure, he tells at the state-owned CGTN.

A market of four billion users is waiting to be tapped into and William Bao Bean, managing director of the Shanghai-based SOSV, explains how his MOX is helping startups to do so. With a solid background in banking, telecom and the internet, William saw how mobile applications disrupted traditional industries, and offer new possibilities for companies to enter developing markets.

Enterprise accelerator MOX (mobile only accelerator) let six startups show-case in Singapore last week. William Bao Bean, partner at the Shanghai-based SOSV explains how his network helps to use big data to enhance their chances on a global market, he tells at E27.

In China, Tencent’s WeChat became the leading messaging apps, but  – unlike many think in the West – it is not government censorship that kept international competition at bay, says WeChat expert Matthew Brennan in The National. Also in other countries, local messaging app prove to be stronger.

Business analyst Shaun Rein author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order defines three different relations China can have with other countries: hot, warm or cold partners. From Cambodia he reports how a hot partner like Cambodia can deal with its powerful neighbor, according to the Phnom Penh Post. 

China’s erstwhile “peaceful rise” has been less peaceful over the past years. Will China face a pushback from its neighbors, asks former foreign correspondent Mary Kay Magistad author Howard French of Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power in a wide ranging interview about his book in PRI.

China is inching up as a world power, and author Howard French of Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power finds it about time to dive deeping into what moves the country’s political thinking, says the Irish Times in a review. French: ” “China will wish to restore itself to the pinnacle of affairs in East Asia.”