Hong Kong is economically on a downhill slope and its current problems do not help the city to stop that, says Jim Rogers, veteran investor, at his weblog. “China’s opening up so we don’t need Hong Kong anymore.”

Hong Kong’s days as a financial market are not yet numbered, but in the long run, the city has tough problems, says celebrity investor Jim Rogers to RT. Rogers is Singapore-based, an island that hopes to benefit from the downturn of Hong Kong as a recession is looming.

US investor Jim Rogers started to explore China in 1984 and has since become a bridge builder between the East and the West. At China’s state TV CGTN he dives into his views on China, the way he raises his family in Singapore and the ongoing madness in Washington. Jim Rogers published several bestsellers, including A Gift to My Children: A Father’s Lessons for Life and Investing.

Trump is making China great again, argues super-investor Jim Rogers, author of Street Smarts: Adventures on the Road and in the Markets, at Nasdaq. Trade wars have always failed in the past, he says, and wonders if Trump is going to be the only exception in history.

China is in the middle of the 10th Single’s Day, a very successful shopping holiday. But both the US-China trade war and the drop in stock markets might hit the most optimistic expectations as consumer confidence drops, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting fromRead More →

A market of four billion users is waiting to be tapped into and William Bao Bean, managing director of the Shanghai-based SOSV, explains how his MOX is helping startups to do so. With a solid background in banking, telecom and the internet, William saw how mobile applications disrupted traditional industries, and offer new possibilities for companies to enter developing markets.

Enterprise accelerator MOX (mobile only accelerator) let six startups show-case in Singapore last week. William Bao Bean, partner at the Shanghai-based SOSV explains how his network helps to use big data to enhance their chances on a global market, he tells at E27.

Two decades ago Jim Rogers moved to Singapore as he emerges as a major bull on Asia. Since then he stuck to his guns as a successful investor, made sure his daughters were fluent in Mandarin and became a leading voice on investments in China, Asia and elsewhere. Now he is predicting a bear market, the worst we have ever seen. Most recently he published Street Smarts: Adventures on the Road and in the Markets. 

Who will survive in the travel industry: the global giants or the local ventures, was a question for William Bao Bean, managing director of the Shanghai-based Chinaccelerator, at the WIT 2017 Conference in Singapore. William, who guided hundreds of startups, believes the big internet firms will crush the small ones, writes WebinTravel.

Many cities, including those in China, are teeming with startups. Many will fail, some will succeed. Timing and resilience are two factors that are crucial for the success of startups and their founders, says William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator at the WIT Bootcamp 2017, according to Web In Travel.

Try to solve a problem, do not focus too much on your own product, tells Chinaccelerator managing director William Bao Bean at a CNBC tech talk panel in Singapore entrepreneurs looking for VC money. He saw too many entrepreneurs trying to enter China and Asia without asking themselves whether it was needed.