Private companies have a hard time getting bank loans, says economist Arthur Kroeber to Barron’s. But that is nothing new, he adds, the problem is that state-owned companies get loans too easy. That division is more important than the level of China’s debts, he adds. “Too much attention has been paid to the debt problem.”

For a while, China’s Renminbi or Yuan looked like a potential competitor in international markets. But China has lost that opportunity, says economist Arthur Kroeber in OZY. “Who’s going to issue or buy bonds in a market where liquidity can be turned off at the drop of a hat?” he asks.

China’s currency, the yuan, is on a downward track, not because of government action, but is a market reaction on the US tariffs on Chinese goods, says investment guru Jim Rogers. Washington has to blame itself for the weakening yuan, he tells in the Stocknewsbrief.com.

The trade war damages both US and China’s economy, and global trade. Financial and political analyst Victor Shih, Ho Miu Lam Chair associate professor of political economy at UC San Diego and author of the forthcoming “Economic Shocks and Authoritarian Stability,” gives an overview of the damage in the Los Angeles Times.

China promised to open up its financial industry under the pressure of the ongoing trade war. But the industry was not right away impressed: they had heard this song often enough. Financial analyst Sara Hsu looks at how China is keeping its promises this time and says the country is still underdelivering, she writes in China Focus.

After a lengthy crackdown on shadow banking, this risky financial tool seems to be back in grace as China’s economy is slowing down. It is the pragmatic way China’s financial authorities deal with the economy, financial analyst Sara Hsu says. Shadow banking will be allowed, as long as it works, she writes in China Focus.

China is pondering to throw in a currency deal in its trade negotiations with the US, maintaining the value of the Renminbi, to pacify the doves in the White House. But that might be a wrong idea, say analysts like economist Arthur Kroeber, who point at Japan. Japan agreed to a currency deal in 1985 as has paid for it dearly, writes the South China Morning Post.

P2P lending used to be one of the darlings of the financial industry in China, but those days are over, describes financial analyst Sara Hsu in a thorough overview of the developments at SupChina. More consolidation of the industry is expected, she adds.

China’s economy is going through a reduced growth and, says investor Jim Rogers, that might be an excellent idea as the country has to bring back its debts, he says on his weblog. ‘China’s economy is slowing, fortunately for China and fortunately for the world.”

China’s bad loans are increasing, but the country’s financial authorities have been trying to crack down on this source of financial stability. How are those efforts faring now China is suffering from a relative drop in economic growth. Financial analyst Sara Hsu discusses the dilemma’s the authorities are facing especially now the trade war is ongoing.

China’s financial institutions ponder on the pros and cons of a currency devaluation as the effects of the trade war with the US start to kick in. While devaluation is on the agenda, it would be a tricky road, says financial analyst Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation, at CapitalWatch.

Devaluating the Chinese Yuan can be an attractive, but also dangerous way for China to deal with the effect of the ongoing trade war, says financial and political analyst Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation to Reuters. ” It is likely that corruption is returning, which will undermine Chinese capital control measures.”