Anti-China protests in Hong Kong are likely spilling over into 2020, but both Hong Kong and mainland China need to realize they still need each other, despite all the changes over the past decades, argues financial analyst Sara Hsu at China Rising.

After a first symbolic truce, the world should brace for the next phase in the trade war between China and the US, warns leading economist Arthur Kroeber, according to Barron’s. China has stalled its economic reforms and mechanisms to contain the US power fail, and the technology war is likely to resume, he stresses.

China’s internet companies are moving fast into India, but find a very different situation, says William Bao Bean, managing director of the Shanghai-based Chinaccelator and founder of the MOX SOSV’s Mobile-Only Accelerator. India is very diverse, offering a more competitive environment.

A limited trade deal might be in the pipeline for the coming weeks, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® in the Stock Daily Dish. But the trade war is far from over, he warns. “There is a material risk (say 20 to 25%) that we don‘t get a deal.”

Pulitzer-price winning journalist Ian Johnson describes the decline of Hong Kong, in all possible ways – not only economically, as China rose, for the NY Review of Books. “Hong Kong failed to install visionary leaders who might have helped Hong Kong retain its place among the handful of truly key global cities,” he writes. 

What is Beijing’s worst nightmare? The trade war? The troubles in Hong Kong. No, says political economist Shirley Ze Yu. China’s real nightmare is a collapse of the property market, she writes in the South China Morning Post. “China’s property market is the grey rhino, overfed on massive liquidity steroids.”

Local governments in China have amassed an amazing amount of debt. Dropping revenue and disappointing economic performance is a major challenge, writes financial analyst Sara Hsu in the China-US Focus. “The outlook for local government financials is not positive.”

Hong Kong is economically on a downhill slope and its current problems do not help the city to stop that, says Jim Rogers, veteran investor, at his weblog. “China’s opening up so we don’t need Hong Kong anymore.”