Women in China might be regaining some tracking in the economy, they are still lacking political leverage and earn on average less than men, says author Zhang Lijia at Wion. “According to Zhang, if China wants to improve the lives of women, it will first need to accord them equal status in society and politics.”

Author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel, a book on prostitution in China, divided into the current sex industry and explains to Brave Media why it boomed. Earnings can be ten times as high compared to a factory job, she says.

Women have been bearing most of the burden of China’s shift from state economy to market economy, says author Zhang Lijia of Lotus: A Novel, on prostitution in China, at the BBC World Service. Despite a lot of advantages, women suffered severe setbacks. State owned companies let women go at 45 years of age, and getting hired at the sexist job market has been harder than ever, she adds. “Some refuse to hire women at a child-bearing age.”

Top executives at China’s internet giant Tencent earn higher salaries than their counterparts at Amazon, Twitter, Intel Apple and IBM, according to job portal Zhaopin.com. Business analyst Shaun Rein is not surprised, he tells the South China Morning Post. There is no other way to retain their talent in China.

China´s labor conditions were notoriously bad, but the shift to higher-skilled, younger laborers, and better legislation has changed the country profoundly, writes urbanization expert Sara Hsu in the Diplomat. Although, there is still room for more improvement.

Wages have been rising fast in China, and companies are struggling to improve productivity of their workers to remain competitive. There is still much to win, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The End of Copycat China: The Rise of Creativity, Innovation, and Individualism in Asia in Business Week.

Against the global trend, China is capping the salaries of the leaders of its major state-owned companies. A good idea, says Zhang Juwei of the Chinnese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) in the Global Times, and in the long run beneficial for the quality of those firms.

Worldwide corporate executives might earn more than ever before, China is cutting their salaries to reduce the gap between poor and rich. China´s state owned companies (SOE´s) are setting an example, says Zhang Juwei, a research fellow at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, at the Global Times.

Blatant discrimination on the job market is one of the major challenges for women in China. But they are gearing up to sue companies and institutions in court, if their adds search for ´male only´, notes author Zhang Lijia in ChinaFile.

The wealth gap in Hong Kong is widening and WSJ wealth editor Wei Gu explains who are the winners and the losers. That economic disparity has been an underlying ground for the recent protests in Hong Kong, she explains. Real estate en retail belong to the winners, students and workers lose most of the time.