H&M got hit by an unprecedented boycott from Chinese consumers, as the China internet went after the company for its stance on labor in Xinjiang. Partly that vehement outpour of anger was caused because internet companies have been under government investigations, says veteran business analyst Shaun Rein, so they had to prove more than ever they were not a danger for that government, he says at AP.Read More →

China is following the European Union’s GDPR in trying to regulate the unruly data industry, says Winston Ma, Winston Ma, adjunct professor at the New York University School of Law at CNBC. China’s internet companies based for years their business models on consumers’ lack of awareness of privacy, he adds, but those days are over.Read More →

Alibaba and Tencent were high-profile casualties as the central government stepped in to regulate free-wheeling tech firms with growing financial clout. To the relief of consumers and smaller competitors, exponential growth in the tech industry is over, tells Winston Ma, former managing director of the sovereign wealth firm China Investment Corporation (CIC) in New York to Reuters.Read More →

The US used to be a benchmark for many innovative companies and startups, but China is now leading the way, says VC William Bao Bean with a major portfolio in China, Asia in a webinar of NYU SPS Integrated Marketing and Communications. He explains what lessons can be learned from China.Read More →

China’s government shocked the fintech industry by introducing firm financial measures, similar to the banking sector. Ant Financial even had to cancel its massive IPO. But what we have seen is only the start of more government action to regulate the internet, says fintech expert Sara Hsu in the Diplomat. Managing capital and data are key elements.Read More →

China’s automotive industry has traditionally taken a backseat compared to global competitors, but is planning a major overtake when it comes to pushing startups on self-driving, says China lawyer Mark Schaub in the Asia Nikkei. “In China, if you always wait till the law comes into effect, you are six months to a year behind what the regulators are saying,” Schaub said.Read More →