When Alibaba emerged, it first had to face formidable competition from the US. Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explains in the South China Morning Post how the nimble operation from Hangzhou was able to beat EachNet and eBay.

Deep insight in consumer behaviour is what marketing should offer, writes branding guru Tom Doctoroff, author of What Chinese Want: Culture, Communism, and China’s Modern Consumer, on his LinkedIn page. Cluttering that insight with “exaggerated faith in algorithms, programmatic efficacy and hyper-personalization,” is not helpful he adds. And: “Insights are not observations.”

Google, Ebay and Amazon are just some of the tech giants who failed in China. With a good preparation that would not have happened, claims William Bao Bean, managing director of the ChinaAccelarator. His organization prepares startups for launches in China, and Chinese firms for going global.

E-commerce is booming with expected annual growth of 50%, tells business analyst Shaun Rein at BloombergTV. Costs for brick-and-mortar stores are high, labor costs are booming, so much business is going online. Without big US players like Amazon and Ebay though.

Author Helen Wang attended the much-debated speech of Alibaba’s Jack Ma at Stanford, where he discussed – among others – the purchase of Yahoo. Helen Wang explains in Forbes why he said he would be interested, but will in fact never buy Yahoo.

Helen Wang via Flickr Celebrity author Helen Wang of The Chinese Dream: The Rise of the World’s Largest Middle Class and What It Means to You tells Forbes’ Beijing chief Edy Gapstein during her book launch how she defines the ‘middle class’ and explains why Ebay lost their battle against JackRead More →

Jack Ma of Alibaba In the slipstream of the most recent Yahoo–Alibaba brawl Helen Wang recalls the long-standing tradition of failure Yahoo’s ecommerce site Ebay had in China. From an excerpt of her upcoming book “The Chinese Dream” in Forbes. The struggle started in 2004: In 2004, I visited AlibabaRead More →

Shaun Rein   by Fantake via Flickr Chinese brands might have been competing on prices and distribution in 2005, in 2010 they are moving up in the value chain and worry Western brands, writes Shaun Rein in Forbes. Quality and image-building have entered China’s board rooms. Look at Google. Our researchRead More →

Private equity investor / advisor, Peking University professor, best-selling author and speaker. His writing and speaking are on how rising Chinese consumers (and companies) are disrupting global markets. (#consumerchina). According to LinkedIn, he is the most widely followed business professor in China (+1.4M followers online).”

Shaun Rein is the Managing Director of the China Market Research Group, the world’s leading strategic market intelligence firm focused on China. He is one of the world’s recognized thought leaders on strategy consulting in China. In 2012 he published the bestseller “The End of Cheap China.” He travels from Shanghai.

Kaiser Kuo is an American-born writer, rock musician, technology watcher and cultural commentator. In June 2010 he became director international communication at China’s largest search engine, Baidu.com. Baidu was the first Chinese company to become part of the NASDAQ-100 index.