Now a massive row of Chinese companies, including Alibaba, are preparing for IPO´s, both at home at abroad, insights in China´s financial industry are more important than ever,

The government wants to allow market forces to decide what financial direction the country is taking, and because more than even capital is owned by Chinese citizens, just looking at what the central government in Beijing is doing, is not longer good enough.

Private companies have a hard time getting bank loans, says economist Arthur Kroeber to Barron’s. But that is nothing new, he adds, the problem is that state-owned companies get loans too easy. That division is more important than the level of China’s debts, he adds. “Too much attention has been paid to the debt problem.”

Hong Kong’s days as a financial market are not yet numbered, but in the long run, the city has tough problems, says celebrity investor Jim Rogers to RT. Rogers is Singapore-based, an island that hopes to benefit from the downturn of Hong Kong as a recession is looming.

Hong Kong might have lost much importance as a gateway to mainland China, for the financial markets Beijing still needs a stable Hong Kong, says financial analyst Victor Shih in NTD. The reason Chinese entities are borrowing through Hong Kong is that the financial institutions around the world, including the International Monetary Fund, legally treat Hong Kong as a separate entity, he said.

If some US politicians hope the trade war between China and the US might undermine Xi Jinping’s domestic power base, they are on the wrong track, says political analyst Victor Shih at US-China Economic and Security Review Commission hearings at the US Congress, according to the South China Morning Post.

The trade war damages both US and China’s economy, and global trade. Financial and political analyst Victor Shih, Ho Miu Lam Chair associate professor of political economy at UC San Diego and author of the forthcoming “Economic Shocks and Authoritarian Stability,” gives an overview of the damage in the Los Angeles Times.

China has been saving much capital in US bonds and could use those resources to finance its debt and policies in the past. But what happens if China runs out of US dollars, asks political analyst Victor Shih in the New York Times.

Transparency is not a natural thing for China, not domestically nor internationally. But African states can ask China for more transparency, argues journalist Howard French, author China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants are Building a New Empire in Africa, to Inkstone.

In its fight against an economic slowdown, China has opened the bank vaults again and pumped more credit into its financial systems, again, says political analyst Victor Shih, author of Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation to the New York Times. It is an old solution in a country where debts are already at dangerous levels, he says.

Yujiapu, Tianjin’s financial district, is building China’s Manhattan, with loans since most inhabitants still have to arrive. That goes well, says financial analyst Victor Shih, as long as the project has the political goodwill in Beijing to subscribe giants loans, he tells in the New York Times.

The trade negotiations between China and the US might be in their endgame, but the differences are still huge. The US wants China to stop running their economy as they have always done, says economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, to the Asia Society blog.