US legislators might support a bill to force Chinese firms listed in the US to let the US stock regulators, the PCAOB, check their files. But those checks will not prevent frauds like those by Luckin as some US senators claim, warns audit expert Paul Gillis on his weblog Chinaaccountingblog. Some predictions on what will happen after the bill has been adopted.Read More →

Chaos reigns the White House as US presidential advisor Peter Navarro said the China trade deal was dead and was promptly corrected by US President Donald Trump who said the opposite. Business analyst Shaun Rein says at the BBC Trump cannot control his lieutenants, as they prefer to blame China for anything that goes wrong.Read More →

China is trying to contain a second wave of the coronavirus. Economist Arthur Kroeber looks at what the government wants to do. Unlike other countries, China tries to eradicate the number of cases to zero, whatever it might cost. Even though that is not realistic, it has huge consequences for some consumer good sectors and travel, who might not recover for the time being. An overview of the situation in June.Read More →

China has been banning US regulators at the PCAOB from getting access to information of Chinese companies at US stock markets, as they should do according to US regulations to protect its state secrets. But things are changing, notes auditing expert Paul Gilles at his weblog Chinaaccountingblog. “I suspect that Yi’s comments are a signal that China will back down on this issue, allowing joint inspections with adequate controls to protect state secrets,” writes Gillis.Read More →

Livestreaming e-commerce took off like crazy in China in 2020, partly because of the coronavirus pandemic. Marketing guru Ashley Dudarenok opens the discussion on where this trend is leading to at Technode. “Various livestreaming platforms are maturing, becoming more mainstream and the epidemic has led to the growth of online work, entertainment, and consumption,” she writes.Read More →

Two months ago we still hoped the event industry would recover from the Covid-19 crisis in a similar way as SARS in 2002/3. But history seldom repeats itself and also in this case it looks we have been too optimistic. While much of Europe is slowly opening up, and other parts of the world remain in crisis mode, the traditional events as we knew them might not return any time soon. Whether we will go through a second wave of the corona crisis is still an open question: major disruption is here to stay.

That is bad news for those event companies who relied on physical conferences including massive flights, hotel bookings, and entertainment for their business model. Much of our business disappeared initially, leaving our speakers often empty-handed. Now a miraculous revival of the event industry might not come fast, at the CSB we can focus on our core business: connecting established China experts to companies and organizations eager to pick their brains, now in online seminars.Read More →

Chinese listings at US stock markets got recently under fire. Former US assistant trade representative Harry Broadman looks with some amazement at this market at the International Finance Law Review (IFLR). “After decades of working in China intensively on financial accounting, there is not a single state-owned enterprise I’ve worked on that I can think of that abided by international accounting standards,” Broadman says.Read More →

Nationalistic sentiments at the recent National People’s Congress (NPC) triggered off proposals to abolish English translations on all government-related events in China. London-based author Zhang Lijia explains why that is the wrong move, and why learning English is still important, also for Chinese, at the South China Morning Post.Read More →