Self-driving cars are going to change our life beyond recognition. But there is a lot of work to be done on cybersecurity to let them drive safely, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.  a sector in which major car manufacturers such as Audi, Daimler, Toyota, BMW, Nissan, Volvo rub shoulders with new electric vehicle manufacturers such as Tesla and are also vying with established tech giants such as Google, Baidu, Apple, Samsung, Tencent and competing with new tech such as ride-hailing companies such as Didi and Uber?

China is diving fast into self-driving cars. But while cybersecurity has become a major issue in IT, in the combination of self-driving cars, cybersecurity is not getting the attention it deserves, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub on the China Law Insight, focusing on the legal risks and the actions the Chinese government did take.

China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) has published last week an ambitious draft road map for the development of self-driving cars in the coming decades. Lawyer Mark Schaub summarizes the latest details of the fast-moving central planning office on the China Law Insight.

Getting rid of legal barriers is key for using innovation in real life, and Beijing approved the first regulations in China on self-driving cars, writes lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight. He elaborates on the details. “We expect more regions to follow Beijing’s lead and compete for innovation in this key sector,” he adds.

Luxury car brands tell much about the ambitions of their owners, and how people think about them, disclosed the Hurun White Paper on luxury cars last week. In the Global Times an overview of the profiles of the owners of Audi, BMW, Mercedes- Benz, Lexus, Volvo, Land Rover, Cadillac and Infiniti, according to Hurun founder Rupert Hoogewerf.

How does the Chinese luxury brand owner look like, wondered Rupert Hoogewerf and his Hurun Rich List firm provided a thorough analysis of this successful market, They looked at the Audi, BMW, Mercedes Benz, Lexus, Volvo, Land Rover, Cadillac and Infiniti. A report from the Malaysia Chronicle.

A larger number of foreign companies have been accused of price-fixing. For all the wrong reasons, and based on little proof, argues author Paul French in Ethical Corporation. They include “Unilever, Qualcomm, Mercedes-Benz, Audi, Chrysler, Microsoft, BMW, Nike, a whole bunch of Japanese car parts manufacturers and quite a few other corporations”.

Low interest consumer credits are booming in China, tells retail analyst Shaun Rein at WSJ. Ten years ago credit cards did not exists and consumers would even a few years ago purchase BMW’s by bringing cash. But despite the boom bad credit is no issue yet, he says, as limits are touch compared to the US.

Crisis or no crisis, luxury cars are doing very well, also in China where the number of super-rich keeps on growing. China’s rich list founder Rupert Hoogewerf bets on the country’s luxury market and especially German cars, he tells The National.