Workers in China’s tech industry have been fighting the long work hours they make, the 996 – nine to nine working, six days a week. It’s difficult, admits William Bao Bean, managing director of startup accelerators Chinaccelerator and MOX, in the Asia Nikkei. The art for leaders at startups is motivating their teams.

Major industries like travel, retail, automotive, telecom and others see their traditional business models changing very fast. At Shanghai-based SOSV managing director William Bao Bean helps startups to make money in new ways, based on data, and capture fast emerging markets, he tells at the Phocuswright Europe conference in Amsterdam last week. Companies should not cling to melting margins, but identify where money can be made, he argues.

China’s internet giant Tencent has become a winner, first by copying US competitors, but now it has become their inspirator, says Tencent-watcher Matthew Brennan to Leadersleague. “WeChat does not monetize data, but it is a growth lever for other businesses in the Tencent group. It’s a bit like iOS or Android in that regard,” says Brennan.

Google’s effort to enter China’s censored search market has failed a second time, first in China itself, now because of opposition in the US and Google staff. Former communication director Kaiser Kuo at China’s leading search engine Baidu looks back at how the internet company failed at its first move back in 2006, for the MIT Technology Review.

While the criminal case for sexual harassment against JD.com CEO Richard Liu is still unclear, to say the least, its shareholders are getting nervous, says financial analyst Shaun Rein, and author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to the Nikkei Asian Review.  “Worries will grow over timeRead More →

Google needs a strategy to enter China if it wants another one billion users, but that is not going to be easy, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order in the Hindustan Times. Especially since China’s search engine Baidu is way better in speaking Chinese.

When Alibaba emerged, it first had to face formidable competition from the US. Business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order explains in the South China Morning Post how the nimble operation from Hangzhou was able to beat EachNet and eBay.

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

Startups are mostly at the mercy of quasi-monopolies like Facebook, Google, Tencent or Alibaba. William Bao Bean, managing director of Shanghai-based SOSV tells in this elevator talk how his no.1 accelerator helps them to avoid spending money on those giants to get access to an audience, creating a win-win situation.

Tencent’s WeChat has been a winner in China in terms of users but might even beat its Western competitors in terms of functionality, writes WeChat analyst Matthew Brennan at the China Channel. The bigger question is will the tech giants outside China ever be able to catch up?