Ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing, the main competitor of Uber, is trying to move upscale, into self-driving cars, foreign cooperation and projects out of China, but at home, they still face basic challenges, says Shanghai-based business analyst Ben Cavender. Local authorities focus on illegal drivers, according to Reuters.

China overtook the US as the home of most unicorns, startups with a valuation of over US$1 billion, says the latest Hurun Report, according to the South China Morning Post. Hurun publisher Rupert Hoogewerf: “These unicorns, mostly in the new economy, are the fastest-growing companies with the most potential to grow big against a slowing economy.”

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

After local regulations in Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing to organize tests with self-driving cars, China’s central government now has issued national rules to streamline those tests, writes Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.

Self-driving cars are going to change our life beyond recognition. But there is a lot of work to be done on cybersecurity to let them drive safely, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.  a sector in which major car manufacturers such as Audi, Daimler, Toyota, BMW, Nissan, Volvo rub shoulders with new electric vehicle manufacturers such as Tesla and are also vying with established tech giants such as Google, Baidu, Apple, Samsung, Tencent and competing with new tech such as ride-hailing companies such as Didi and Uber?

Bike-sharing companies in China had a rough year, combining huge investments and limited returns. Smaller ones went bankrupt and market leaders Mobike and Ofo are rumored to discuss a merger. Peking University investment professor Jeffrey Towson still see enough room for success, he tells the South China Morning Post.

The rest of the world looks with amazement at the crazy, booming sharing economy in China, and wonder whether the rest of the world might follow. One of the reasons, people here like to jump in when something is new, says Peking University professor Jeffrey Towson at CBS.

Innovation expert William Bao Bean, managing Director of SOSV’s Chinaccelerator, discusses entering the China market is tough, if not impossible for foreign players in many industries. In the Hutong podcast, William  looks at the way he trains Chinese startups for a global play, and foreign startups for the China market.

Competition in China is rough and bloody for almost every company that even has the smell of possible success. But Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson did not yet find a reason why this rule does not apply to Starbucks. No competitor gets near the giant and – he wonders at his weblog – there is no real reason for that.

After beating Uber, Didi Chuxing is now preparing to go international. And they have to, says business analyst Shaun Rein to Digital Trends, because at home they face growing governmental limits in expanding their business.

Since last year car-hailing giant Didi Chuxing has been raising over US$15 billion, even after it won the costly competitive struggle with Uber. Beida business professor Jeffrey Towson sees at his weblog four reasons why Didi continues to raise so much capital. Here are two of them.