Not only high costs are stopping Chinese women from getting more children, as the government wants them to for offsetting the dramatic aging process of the country, writes journalist Zhang Lijia, author of Lotus, a novel, on prostitution in China,  in the South China Morning Post. “The reality is far more complex. One important reason, in my view, is that women have changed. They don’t care to be only the reproductive tool of the family or the state,” she writes.

Brands need to dive into youth subcultures in stead of focusing on platforms, says branding expert Arnold Ma at a meeting in London. You have to focus on people, rather than technology, and he explains how three rebellious Chinese youth subcultures relate to different brands.

2019 is nearing its end, and some of our speakers look back. Arnold Ma, CEO of Qumin, got some raving reviews of speeches he gave this year, and he would like to share. We gladly support him in sharing those client views with you.

Tencent’s WeChat has been an unprecedented success story on the China internet. But new platforms are undermining the dominance of WeChat, says marketing expert Arnold Ma, CEO of London-based Qumin, at  CBBC. Short-video medium Douyin is one of them.

What is Beijing’s worst nightmare? The trade war? The troubles in Hong Kong. No, says political economist Shirley Ze Yu. China’s real nightmare is a collapse of the property market, she writes in the South China Morning Post. “China’s property market is the grey rhino, overfed on massive liquidity steroids.”

TikTok and Douyin, both owned by Bytedance, are two short-video successes, undermining the supremacy of WeChat, explains marketing guru Arnold Ma and CEO of London-based agency Qumin at the China Film Insider. Just like Facebook, WeChat is losing traction among the youngsters, he says.

Arnold Ma, CEO of the London-based marketing agency Qumin, has decided to join the China Speakers Bureau.

His focus is on China’s opening up to global markets, with a specialty on the country’s millenniums and subcultures that are becoming key for global companies trying to finetune their China operations.

A raving review of the appearance of Zhang Lijia, author of Lotus, a novel, on prostitution in China, at the Jaipur Literary Festival in London, at The Citizen. “I was very fascinated by prostitutes. However, the only prostitution I have done was intellectual prostitution,” Zhang Lijia says.

The China Speakers Bureau is happy to announce that Dr. Shirley Ze Yu has decided to join the China Speakers Bureau. She is currently visiting Senior Fellow, Institute of Global Affairs at the London School of Economics.