China and South Korea might be starting to resume their economies, the rest of the world is getting further into lock-down mode. After Italy, the rest of Europe and the United States are only at the beginning of the corona virus pandemic. And for sure nobody in those countries is in de mood to prepare for a life after the current crisis.

At the China Speakers Bureau, we do start to look ahead, also as more events are cancelled and international flights still seem in a unstoppable free fall. But one thing is sure: even when timing is unclear, this crisis will be disappearing in the months to come, even when experts already predict a second wave of patients after the summer. In our line of business the average lead time between inquiries for speaker’ assignments and execution is on average three months, and we do not want to start for resumption of our business until the pandemic has officially stopped.

The medical magazine The Lancet was one of the first Western media to point out the rest of the world could learn from the way China had dealt with the corona crisis. The severe lock-down of Wuhan and Hubei province, and the extended deployment of medics from the rest of China, was then still seen as too draconian to be used on other parts of the world.

Now Italy is in a lock-down and medical care in Northern parts are in crisis, while the rest of Europe looks surprised. “They are in a crisis,” said a shaken Dutch doctor on Dutch TV last night, after he made a phone call to a colleague in Milan. Displaying confidence in your own capabilities sometimes becomes a handicap.

The China government is trying to push positive news in the way it handles the coronavirus crisis, but the economic fallout is only shaping up as the panic moves to other parts of the world. Airlines, shipping lines and other logistics and hospitality providers are maintaining the reduction on services, as demand is not yet picking up. Some logistic providers contemplate resuming services only in June, although they do not wish to confirm that less-favorable scenario.

Europe has become the latest victim of the coronavirus panic, and the number of patients rises, while numbers in the Americas are still low, but expected to go up too.

Why is retail giant Suning going for one of Europe´s largest soccer clubs, while other Chinese tycoons went for the smaller fish? It is part of the firm´s global strategy, expending into Europe, says Rupert Hoogewerf, founder of the Hurun China rich list in the International Business Times.

Representatives of the China Speakers Bureau will be traveling to Southern Europe in the second half of April. Stop-overs are scheduled for #Switzerland (Geneva, Lausanne and Zurich), France (#Lyon) and Italy (#Milan). If you are interested to meet one of our people in person, do drop us a line.

Chinese tourists not only boom in numbers, they are much harder to understand, as their wishes diversify. China hospitality expert Roy Graff discusses at the China Weekly Hangout the place of governments, travel agents and the tourists themselves.

Wall Street Journal’s wealth editor Wei Gu discusses with luxury goods veteran Francis Gouten the current slowdown in luxury good sales, and how brands should refocus. Since only a wealthy 3 percent of the Chinese buyers have a passport, Milan and Paris should focus on them, not the large masses. Without giving discounts.

Chinese tourists have taken over cities like Paris and Milan, purchasing large amounts of luxury goods. WSJ’s wealth editor Wei Gu gives a few tips for foreign companies. Stay out of China, and do not expect to make money on food and hotels.

Bored with Hong Kong, Milan and Paris, China’s rich are turning to new places, notably in Africa, writes Wei Gu, luxury editor of the Wall Street Journal in Scene Asia. Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia are on the agenda. 60,000 visited Africa in the first half of 2012, a jump of 68%.

China’s luxury goods market might still be going strong, despite a dip in the country’s growth. But previously popular brands like Burberry are losing traction, tells retail analyst Paul French in the Huffington Post. But there is still hope.

Shaun Rein by Fantake via Flickr The luxury goods market in China is growing fast, says Shaun Rein in CNBC, but retailers often focus on the wrong kind of customers. The rich grab a visa and shop in Milan and Hong Kong. Aspiring young buyers still want their Gucci bags,Read More →