Beijing is regaining its position of China’s spiritual universe, writes author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the New York Times. While much of its past has been destroyed, the city where Johnson lives is now regaining its position of China’s spiritual capital. A struggle between commerce, communist and traditional values.Read More →

Hundreds of millions Chinese turn to religion, as part of a spiritual revival, tells author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to CBN. “While the government remains deeply suspicious of China’s religious revival, Johnson says it hasn’t stopped people from exploring matters of faith.”Read More →

Not registered gatherings of religious believers have been a major force in the growing search for religion in China, but – says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in the Atlantic – they have largely been condoned by the government, and Johnson does not believe that might change.Read More →

To get rich is glorious was China’s leading principle for decades, but slowly the country starts to search for a moral foundation, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao to PJMedia. “According to Johnson, China lacks the mechanisms the U.S. has available for creating social change. In China.”Read More →

China’s emerging religious experiences have often been misunderstood by the West, says author Ian Johnson of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao in an interview with the New York Times. “I think the government is happy to see these things grow—almost as a form of stability.”Read More →

Journalist Zhang Lijia’s book Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China hides nice jewels in different corners. Sex workers often held very strong religious believes, she tells Karen Ma in AsianCha.”I believe it is their way of cleansing themselves, but also because they feel the deities won’t judge them.”Read More →

Zhang Lijia, Ian Johnson and Howard French made it to the top-25 of China books of the Signature website of the US literary agency with the same name. The authors are praised, as they help to move away from the classic monolithic picture the West had from China.Read More →

Journalist Ian Johnson will soon publish his groundbreaking book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao. For the New York Times he selected a special story, on how president Xi Jinping became the guardian of Buddhism and other traditional believes, and today uses it, not as an object for repression, but as a part of China’s globalization strategy.Read More →