Starbucks raised its prices, causing a stir among the many users of the popular coffee chain. They will whine a bit, but get over it very soon, says retail analyst Ben Cavender in the China Daily, and he does not expect a sustained backlash.

For the first time in a decade growth of luxury goods in China has stalled, as inflation is larger than the recorder growth, says China’s rich list founder Rupert Hoogewerf, and composer of the China Luxury Goods Price Index in the Shanghai Daily. Causes: the fight against corruption and the economic downturn.

China’s government is trying to change its economy from export and investment oriented into a consumer nirvana. Unfortunately, writes retail analyst Paul French in Channel4, corruption and inflation hinder that policy greatly. What will the upcoming CCP-congress bring?

Cheap labor has made the country into a source of deflation for global consumers, but as Chinese wages go up, consumers in Wall-Mart and elsewhere better prepare for higher prices, tells the author of The End of Cheap China Shaun Rein an in interview with the BBC radio.

Author Shaun Rein of “The End of Cheap China: Economic and Cultural Trends that will Disrupt the World” hits the famous Dylan Ratigan show on his book tour in the US and explains how pollution and food safety haunt Chinese citizens more than a regime change. US consumers will have to pay higher prices.

Your espresso and your hamburger will become more expensive. Those are two of the ten changes the end of cheap China means for you, author Shaun Rein spells out in Forbes. Those changes “are threatening the easy availability of the low-priced goods that have fueled Americans’ consumption-led lifestyle.”

More inflation of wages, food and commodities can be expected, tells business analyst Shaun Rein at CNBC, illustrating the case he makes in his upcoming book The End of Cheap China: Economic and Cultural Trends that will Disrupt the World. Shaun Rein, our China bull, in a bearish mood.

China’s economy shows a slight slowdown, and some economists predict it is the beginning of the end of China’s growth story. Not true, says economic analyst Arthur Kroeber in the New York Times. Despite a dreadful European economy, China is doing ok.

In a surprise move China’s financial authorities decided last week to abandon their tight money lending policy and losend the reigns for its banks again. Wrong policy, says business analyst Shaun Rein in CNBC, who has been praising the government handling of inflation and overspending in the past.

The sudden loosing of the tight banking rules for lending came as a surprise, but economic analyst Arthur Kroeber sees no reason for panic about China’s economy. In the Guardian he gives a historical perspective.

The End of Cheap China: Economic and Cultural Trends that will Disrupt the World is the title of Shaun Rein’s book, expected in March 2012. But the debate on the book has already started, at his linkedIn Group, The End of Cheap China.

Rising food prices are worrying China’s consumers, tells business analyst Shaun Rein in CNBC. Although he also discovered the women keep on shopping for now, although their buying habits changed dramatically.