Registering offshore, through so-called VIE’s or variable interest entities, is more popular than ever for Chinese companies, even though the Chinese government tries to stop this circumventing trick. Tencent Music Entertainment was the last one to use it for its IPO and get away with it because investors seldom read the disclosure, says Paul Gillis, accounting professor at the Peking University, at the Nikkei Asian Review. And for good reasons.Read More →

The successful IPO of Pinduoduo,  the third e-commerce platform in China after Alibaba and JD.com, took many by surprise. But it does not mean Pinduoduo will be equally successful in the future, warns business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, at the South China Morning Post. Just days later, it was accused of hosting counterfeit goods.Read More →

For many outside China the successful IPO on Nasdaq of group purchasing platform Pinduoduo, mildly comparable to the less successful Groupon, came as a surprise. Shanghai-based business analyst Ben Cavender tries to explain the success at Inkstone. It uses the popular Tencent platforms WeChat and QQ.Read More →

Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis points at his weblog at the rumor Goldman Sachs has decided to suspend work on a HNA subsidiary IPO in the US, because they are unable to get enough information on this Chinese conglomerate. Gillis wonders what auditor PwC knows about their client.Read More →

For decades both Chinese and foreign companies in China used to circumvent murky Chinese corporate legislation by setting up so-called VIE´s on outside tax heavens, while the government basically looked away. Those days seem to be over, writes accounting professor Paul Gillis on his webblog, and the question is: what´s next?Read More →

The Chinese Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) will in 2015 drastically change the way how IPO´s take place in China. The government will step back, leaving decision making to the market. To facilitate that change, China needs an audit regulator, writes accounting professor Paul Gillis at his weblog.Read More →

For a short while Alibaba´s chairman Jack Ma looked like he was heading for the position of richest person in China in 2014. But at the end of the year, Wanda chairman Wang Lianlin is contesting that position, as he brings two firms to the Hong Kong stock exchange, tells China Rich List founder Rupert Hoogewerf to WSJ wealth editor Wei Gu.Read More →

What is the room for newcomers in China´s e-commerce after Alibaba´s successful IPO? WSJ wealth editor Wei Gu discusses with Jef Walters of Boston Consulting, and finds that massive growth is still possible. Only half of China´s internet users is purchasing online, and mobile is still taking off in a country where most users have mobile.Read More →