William Bao Bean, partner at SOSV managing director at the Shanghai-based Chinaccelerator, discusses the investment climate in the US, China and Europe at the F50 Global Capital Summit 2019 Fall.  He does not fear the Trump administration, he says, “governments cannot stop businesses even if they want to,” he adds.

Shanghai-based VC William Bao Bean, general partner at SOSV, who is also the managing director of two SOSV accelerator programs—MOX and Chinaccelerator, explains how India is becoming the next bet for his startup accelerator after China, in an interview with Kr-Asia.

Getting customers in the China market was already expensive and the 2019 capital winter makes live for startups even harder, says William Bao Bean, managing director of the Shanghai-based SOSV. That might be bad news initially, but makes them more competitive in the longer run, he says according to Pymnts, quoting the Financial Times.

China tech expert Kaiser Kuo discusses why China tech rise is unsettling the US. He calls back two narratives that did not work out as expected: tech did not liberate us, and did not lead to more political freedom, but rather the opposite.

Tencent might still dominate social media in China with WeChat and QQ, but competition is heating up, and the internet giant is preparing for more competition, says Tencent watcher Matthew Brennan in Asia One. Asia One: “WeChat and QQ are like huge ships … too big to change course toRead More →

Amazon is trying to return to China, but business analyst Shaun Rein doubts severely whether China’s consumers are waiting for the elsewhere so successful Kindle, he tells in Abacus News. China’s Xiaomi could be more successful as a competitor, but has problems of its own, he adds.

TikTok and Douyin, both owned by Bytedance, are two short-video successes, undermining the supremacy of WeChat, explains marketing guru Arnold Ma and CEO of London-based agency Qumin at the China Film Insider. Just like Facebook, WeChat is losing traction among the youngsters, he says.

China veteran Shaun Rein explains at the WSJ Tech Live conference how the policies of US President Donald Trump help China companies to focus on their own innovation instead of buying technology in the US.

Tech companies in China became big by asking their workers to make long hours, 996 in jargon. But those days are over says business analyst Shaun Rein to CBS. Not only is it illegal to let people work those long hours, but qualified workers also leave their jobs, because they want to have a life next to their work too.