The Hangzhou government raised eyebrows as it announced last week it would send 100 officials to private companies to check on them. Professor Paul Gillis at Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management did not see that much news, he tells Bloomberg.

The Chinese government has tried to promote local CPA’s on the expense of the Big Four, but – says  Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis – the 2018 top-10 CPA ranking shows the Big Four are back winning market shares, with PwC, Deloitte and E&Y in the top three, he writes at his Chinaaccountingblog.

US Senator Marco Rubio is drafting a law, the Equity Act, to kick out Chinese companies from US stock markets, unless they comply with the oversight by the Public Company Oversight Board (PCOB) of their information. Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis believes this act might be passed, and although it is not the hottest issue in the ongoing trade war between China and the US, companies will have three years to move, for example to Hong Kong, he writes in the Chinaaccountingblog.

The official trade war between the US and China seems to be entering its end game. But that does not mean the hostilities will end. Making sense out of what the world’s first and second-largest economies will do will only be slightly easier. A few speakers at our office might be able to help you out.

The reform of the income tax in China will drive many expats out of the country as it will kick in by 2021, as foreign and local taxpayers will fall under the same taxation rules, says financial expert Paul Gillis on his weblog. Especially the equal treatment for housing and education costs will become too costly for expats, or their companies.

Two financial regulators in the US, the SEC and the PCAOB, have joined the trade war of their country and combined it with their struggle for better accounting practices in China, writes Beida accounting professor Paul Gillis at his weblog. While the complaints are not new or surprising, he wonders about the timing, Gillis adds.

China’s luxury travelers are high on the agenda of the tourism industry, and Rupert Hoogewerf, publisher of the Hurun China Rich List, sees a few major trends. Family trips are emerging as a preference, and WeChat groups of alumni of key universities a forgotten way to connect to the luxury travelers, he tells in the South China Morning Post.

Registering offshore, through so-called VIE’s or variable interest entities, is more popular than ever for Chinese companies, even though the Chinese government tries to stop this circumventing trick. Tencent Music Entertainment was the last one to use it for its IPO and get away with it because investors seldom read the disclosure, says Paul Gillis, accounting professor at the Peking University, at the Nikkei Asian Review. And for good reasons.

China tech companies feel the pressure from their investors to join the emerging IPO wave, and that might not be a good development, says Paul Gillis, Beida accounting professor, at Nextunicorn.ventures.

In a Washington mall, the Chu Silk manuscript – China’s equivalent of the Dead Sea Scrolls can be found. Journalist Ian Johnson describes how those precious relicts disappeared from China and ended up in the US, a journey now meticulously describes by the Chinese scholar, Prof. Li Ling of the Peking University for the New York Times.