Former trade negotiator Harry Broadman warns at Bloomberg the trade war is far from over despite positive sounds on the phase 1 agreement. US President Donald Trump seems more engaged in winning the 2020 presidential elections than ending the trade war. And he introduces agricultural deals for the US thatRead More →

Renowned trade negotiator Harry Broadman will be visiting Beijing next month from 22 till 26 May. He is still having some time slots available to attend conferences and events during that short period.

The official trade war between the US and China seems to be entering its end game. But that does not mean the hostilities will end. Making sense out of what the world’s first and second-largest economies will do will only be slightly easier. A few speakers at our office might be able to help you out.

2019 does not look good for China’s economy, says financial analyst Sara Hsu, as the effects on import and export of the trade war kick in, and China was experiencing a slowdown already before the trade war started. In the US specific industries are hard hit, like automotive, agriculture and tech, she adds.

On March 1 the 90-day truce in the trade war between the US and China expires. Leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know®, expects a deal is possible, but that certainly does not mean the end of all hostilities, he tells Barron’s.

The American political landscape might be more divided than ever before, political analyst Harry Broadman sees one field where Republicans and Democrats find common ground: restricting foreign investments, especially but not only those from China through the Committee on Foreign Investment in the US (CFIUS), he writes in Gulf News.

Figuring out who might be hurt by the trade war between China and the US is still be tough, but tech companies like Alibaba and Tencent see their US ties as a liability, says financial expert Sara Hsu to Cheddar. “The trade spat between Washington and Beijing has not only quelled investors’ appetites, it has also discouraged Chinese tech giants from expanding internationally.”

First shots have been fired on tariffs in the trade war between the US and China, but the impact has been limited up to now, tells economist Wang Haiyan to CGTN, as the affected numbers are still relatively small. Escalating the effects can be avoided, but to need a compromise by the end of the summer, she says.

Making sense out of US president Donald Trump’s economic policies has become impossible, even for the most seasoned observers, like Harry Broadman. For Forbes he tries to make sense out of the damage Trump has caused up to now, and the decades it will cost to repair that damage.