What is Beijing’s worst nightmare? The trade war? The troubles in Hong Kong. No, says political economist Shirley Ze Yu. China’s real nightmare is a collapse of the property market, she writes in the South China Morning Post. “China’s property market is the grey rhino, overfed on massive liquidity steroids.”

Renowned trade negotiator Harry Broadman will be visiting Beijing next month from 22 till 26 May. He is still having some time slots available to attend conferences and events during that short period.

The official trade war between the US and China seems to be entering its end game. But that does not mean the hostilities will end. Making sense out of what the world’s first and second-largest economies will do will only be slightly easier. A few speakers at our office might be able to help you out.

The appointment of Liu He as president Xi Jinping’s economic top man has started speculations on his political direction, including a restart of reforms. We should not expect Liu to divert too much from the state-driven economic agenda Xi has already set out in the past few years, says leading economist Arthur Kroeber, author of China’s Economy: What Everyone Needs to Know® to the New York Times.

Veteran China foreign correspondent and Pulitzer Price winner Ian Johnson has won the prestigious Shorenstein Journalism Award for 2016, the organization announced. Ian Johnson is currently working for the New York Times and the New York Review of Books. In a few weeks time his book The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao will be available.

The China Speakers Bureau is happy to announce that Zhang Ying, professor on Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University is joining its agency as a speaker.

In China, Alibaba´s executive chairman Jack Ma, is the most generous philanthropist, according to the l2015 Hurun Philanthropy List, writes Yibaba. His donations amounted to 14.5 billion yuan or 2.4 US dollar. The Hurun Philantropy List is produced by Rupert Hoogewerf´s China Rich List.

High profile donations from Chinese wealthy to US top universities have been hitting the headlines a few times. But, discovers WSJ wealth editor Wei from BE Education founder William Vanbergen, donations from China are lagging compared to other nationalities, although that might change.

Young Chinese use social media to develop a new public sphere, away from the old concepts of family ties and Guanxi, argues sociologist Tricia Wang in her Phd. On February 18 she will talk about this subject at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at the Harvard University.

A growing number of Chinese students flee to the US for decent education, including the daughter of upcoming president Xi Jinping. But large scale US initiatives might offer the same education soon at home, expects business analyst Shaun Rein in Forbes.

China has emerged as the second-largest economy in the world but has a hard time telling the world its story. Dr. Shirley Yu is one of the very few exceptions in profiling herself as a solid China-voice, giving an alternative viewpoint on a mostly Western take on the developments of China and the world economy. She is a political economist, board member, author, broadcaster, a global thinker on China and travels from London.