China is not yet one week back from lunar holidays, and the fallout of the coronavirus is not yet clear. We have seen major events being relocated, delayed or even cancelled, speakers being stuck inside or outside China, and potential audiences unable to move around. Meanwhile we are exploring an alternative option, that might help some event organizators: follow the lead from China, and get your speaker online.

Even when the virus might reduce its destructive path over the next two weeks, resuming events might be affected till the end of April, early May. Those are – with June – our most busy months in helping event organizers to get the right speakers in place, before the traditional summer break kicks in.

The Carnegie Council has appointed six Pacific Fellows, among them professor of sociology at the Sophie University in Tokyo James Farrer and author of Shanghai Nightscapes: A Nocturnal Biography of a Global City.

Investments are flooding into China´s innovative industries. But investing in China is a completely different game from the traditional VC approach, tells William Bao Bean, Managing Director of Chinaccelerator, in VentureCon Japan, according to E27. China is providing more finance, and more competition.

With less than a week notice, a connection between Hong Kong and Shanghai stock exchanges will give international investors access to Chinese shares. A game-changer, says Mark Austen of the Asia Securities Industry & Financial Markets Association in a talk with WSJ wealth editor Wei Gu.

Relations between China and Japan might be tense, Chinese companies and individuals spend increasingly their capital in the real estate of Tokyo, writes WSJ wealth editor Wei Gu in her column at the Wall Street Journal.

Hong Kong is loosing its attraction for Chinese tourists. Where are they now going to, wonders WSJ wealth editor Wei Gu in a discussion with Francis Belin from Swarovski. Both Tokyo and Seoul are doing better, but since 96% of the mainland Chinese still do not have a passport, there is room enough for growth, also in Hong Kong.

Guanxi used to be a key word when foreigners came to China to do business, including business women Fredy Bush, the founder of Nasdaq-listed Xinhua Finance, a successful deal in the tough media industry. Wealth editor Wei Gu explains for the WSJ why the now-jailed tycoon could not survive now times have changed.

Bag-seller Gucci bought a majority share in Chinese jeweler Queelin to enter a new segment of the luxury market. A smart move, says business analyst Ben Cavender in Business Week, as jewelry might be the next big thing for Chinese consumers.