Content-providers have been trying to lower costs for the notorious censorship in China, for example by introducing more AI-driven tools. But the government is fearing too much unwanted content if falling through the cracks, asks for tougher censorship, adding dramatically to the costs, says business analyst Ben Cavender to MSN.

The successful social platform Tiktok got into hot water when it comes to its relation with China, now the company goes international. Former Baidu communication director Kaiser Kuo looks at The Ringer how Tiktok thrived, like others, in this climate of uncertainty, fuzziness and unpredictability that is key for China’s internet.

Quality, price and value drive China’s consumers, not patriotism, says business analyst Shaun Rein in the LA Times. They might say something patriotic, but that is not key for their purchases, although China’s media might suggest nationalism is most important for consumers.

For the outside world, Xi Jinping looks like the effective authoritarian leader, killing effectively public debate in the country. But journalist Ian Johnson noted over the past few months an amazing growth of opposition inside the Party, he writes in the NY Review of Books.

Journalist Ian Johnson, author of The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, is working on his next book documenting how writers, thinkers, and artists are dealing with the new, more repressive policies in China. He visited citizen journalist Zhang Shihe near Xi’an for an extensive interview. First, he describes Zhang’s position for the New York Review of Books.

State TV has been pulling a set of historical dramas from their channels because they were having a negative influence on their audiences, according to state media. Journalist Zhang Lijia, the author of Lotus, a novel, a bestseller on prostitution in China, understands the ratio behind this action, she tells in the South China Morning Post.

Google’s effort to enter China’s censored search market has failed a second time, first in China itself, now because of opposition in the US and Google staff. Former communication director Kaiser Kuo at China’s leading search engine Baidu looks back at how the internet company failed at its first move back in 2006, for the MIT Technology Review.

Chinese media got orders to avoid bad news on the economy, but according to financial analyst Sara Hsu, signs indicate that China is unofficially in a recession. Spending has gone down despite encouragement from the government to spend more.

Google needs a strategy to enter China if it wants another one billion users, but that is not going to be easy, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order in the Hindustan Times. Especially since China’s search engine Baidu is way better in speaking Chinese.

China passed this week the threshold of 802 million users and with less than 60% of citizens online, growth is not stalling. And while China’s government has a reputation of controlling the internet, that growth can jeopardize control, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post.

Foreign brands know they need Tencent’s WeChat to sell their products to Chinese consumers, but working with WeChat mean dealing with blocks, says marketing expert Ashley Dudarenok, author of Unlocking the World’s Largest E-Market: A Guide to Selling on Chinese Social Media at AshleyTalks. Not only they have to deal with official rules, also Tencent does not like links to its direct competitors like Alibaba. How to deal with them?