Gamers are increasingly becoming a group of luxury buyers in China, overlapping other segments, says marketing expert Arnold Ma at OZY. “Chinese luxury buyer demographics overlap with hobbies normally associated with a younger audience, such as gaming,” Arnold Ma says.

Li-Ning and Anta, two Chinese shoe sport manufacturers, took a nationalistic twist in their marketing after the US National Basketball Association (NBA) and the Houston Rockets triggered off criticism from China’s government. Marketing expert Tom Doctoroff comments on the slippery slope of nationalism in China marketing for Al Jazeera.

Brands focus too much on social media platforms and generic influencers, and forget often they need to get closer to their customers, says marketing expert Arnold Ma in the McKinsey Report on the 2020 State of Fashion. In China and the rest of Asia consumers are faster to adopt new trends and increasingly guinea pigs for Western brands.

Brands need to dive into youth subcultures in stead of focusing on platforms, says branding expert Arnold Ma at a meeting in London. You have to focus on people, rather than technology, and he explains how three rebellious Chinese youth subcultures relate to different brands.

TikTok and Douyin, both owned by Bytedance, are two short-video successes, undermining the supremacy of WeChat, explains marketing guru Arnold Ma and CEO of London-based agency Qumin at the China Film Insider. Just like Facebook, WeChat is losing traction among the youngsters, he says.

Understanding the consumer in China is tough for most foreign companies entering this competitive market, says retail analyst Ben Cavender. There is no escape from shopping here, as retail is fully integrated into daily life. “China is where all the future trends are happening,” he says.

Sustainability might have been high on the agenda of major fashion brands, most consumers in China still not buy into the concept, says marketing expert Ashley Dudarenok at the Jing Daily. But there is hope for the future as brands focus on the young and future consumers.

China’s consumers used to pay a premium to foreign products, because of the presumed quality and status connected to it. But those easy days for foreign brands are over, says business analyst Shaun Rein at the City Wireselect.

The battle of selling China internally in your larger company is still a struggle, says marketing expert Ashley Dudarenok, at her daily vlog. Heads of China operation feel lonely as they have to explain their headquarters how China works. Outdated views on China, and a global marketing department unwilling to adapt their material to China are just some of their problems.