China’s Single’s Day broke several records, but that is deceptive. Consumers waited for bargains and delayed purchases till Single’s Day, says retail analyst Ben Cavender to Reuters. Reuters: “What’s happened is that you’ve had a lot of consumers this year being a little bit more careful about their purchasing becauseRead More →

From a cash country, where transactions were done by moving plastic bags with money between bank branches, China has turned into a leading force in fintech or financiel technology. Mobile payment are standard. Bitcoins and blockchain technology found in China early adopters. Social media have – more than anywhere in the world – adopted payment systems to facilitate online trade.

Shanghai-based MOX (Mobile Only Accelerator) works from different places in the world, including Taipei. Taiwan offers an excellent launching platform for ventures who look for international expansion into the rest of Asia, says MOX managing director William Bao Bean, according to the News Lens.

In China, the internet is the economy. SOSV managing director William Bao Bean explains how international firms can enter the China market. With magic information on how Tencent and their WeChat dominate the playing field, and how you can win that war. And how Chinese companies are conquering the world.

Mobile has become a key tool, even to buy food on the street. Business analyst Shaun Rein takes NBC’s Richard Engel shopping, even to Alibaba, the front running when it comes to the new retail. How China equals the Post Second World years in the US.

Influencers are key for marketing, says China marketeer Ashley Dudarenok. Platforms might change when time moves on, influencers are here to stay, she adds in Forbes. ” In 2019 you can’t market in China without investing 20-70% of your marketing budget into influencers,” she says.

Your number of followers might be an important metric for popularity, but figuring out who are fake or not is tough, in China, even more than elsewhere, says marketing expert Ashley Dudarenok. And at Weibo the problem is even tougher, she tells at Abacus News.

Facial recognition and the exchange of related data seems to meet little resistance in China, compared to Western consumers. Tencent observer Matthew Brennan sees some rubbles among the public, but indeed no big scale anxiety on facial recognition, he tells in Slate and dives into the different perceptions.

Major industries like travel, retail, automotive, telecom and others see their traditional business models changing very fast. At Shanghai-based SOSV managing director William Bao Bean helps startups to make money in new ways, based on data, and capture fast emerging markets, he tells at the Phocuswright Europe conference in Amsterdam last week. Companies should not cling to melting margins, but identify where money can be made, he argues.

China might have most internet users of the world, but getting an email to them is often hard, as most communicate through domestic social networks like Tencent’s WeChat. Email, unlike WeChat, did not offer tools to make money, explains China veteran Kaiser Kuo as one of the reasons for thatRead More →