China’s economic slowdown has mainly hit local VC’s, says William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelerator, at OZY.com. A government crackdown on risky investments and the fallout from the trade war is hitting the industry after the 2017-2018 boom. OZY.com: Local venture capital firms that raise money and investRead More →

From a cash country, where transactions were done by moving plastic bags with money between bank branches, China has turned into a leading force in fintech or financiel technology. Mobile payment are standard. Bitcoins and blockchain technology found in China early adopters. Social media have – more than anywhere in the world – adopted payment systems to facilitate online trade.

Making sense out of China has always been challenging, although the questions companies and people have to ask themselves change permanently. From a rather uregulated booming economy, now dealing we a tsunami of new rules, anti-corruption and a – relatively – slowing economy changes the strategic questions you have to deal with And while everybody has an opinion, at the China Speakers Bureau we are happy to have a range of expert opinions on China´s strategic challenges. We have a selection here (but you can always ask for more).

China’s competitive landscape is changing fast, and the blooming incubators for startups offer multinational a much-needed edge in local competition, says William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccellator in Shanghai to Forbes. “When you’re under pressure and local players are taking market share from you, you look to innovation.”

Shanghai-based MOX (Mobile Only Accelerator) works from different places in the world, including Taipei. Taiwan offers an excellent launching platform for ventures who look for international expansion into the rest of Asia, says MOX managing director William Bao Bean, according to the News Lens.

In China, the internet is the economy. SOSV managing director William Bao Bean explains how international firms can enter the China market. With magic information on how Tencent and their WeChat dominate the playing field, and how you can win that war. And how Chinese companies are conquering the world.

Tech companies in China became big by asking their workers to make long hours, 996 in jargon. But those days are over says business analyst Shaun Rein to CBS. Not only is it illegal to let people work those long hours, but qualified workers also leave their jobs, because they want to have a life next to their work too.

Workers in China’s tech industry have been fighting the long work hours they make, the 996 – nine to nine working, six days a week. It’s difficult, admits William Bao Bean, managing director of startup accelerators Chinaccelerator and MOX, in the Asia Nikkei. The art for leaders at startups is motivating their teams.

Protecting intellectual property is a main issue for foreign companies in China, and William Bao Bean, managing director of the Chinaccelator in Shanghai gives a few tips on how to avoid problems. First, run faster and execute better than your competitors, so they have no time to copy your IP. And, second, split up your intellectual property is several pieces, so there is not one key to your intellectual castle, he explains at China Canvas.

Major industries like travel, retail, automotive, telecom and others see their traditional business models changing very fast. At Shanghai-based SOSV managing director William Bao Bean helps startups to make money in new ways, based on data, and capture fast emerging markets, he tells at the Phocuswright Europe conference in Amsterdam last week. Companies should not cling to melting margins, but identify where money can be made, he argues.