Private companies in China have become more important than sometimes appreciated, says Rupert Hoogewerf, chairman of the Hurun Research Institute in its latest report, according to the South China Morning Post. They have grown eight times in the past decade, pay most taxes and create most jobs. “Creating value is more than making sales,” says Rupert Hoogewerf.

After a first symbolic truce, the world should brace for the next phase in the trade war between China and the US, warns leading economist Arthur Kroeber, according to Barron’s. China has stalled its economic reforms and mechanisms to contain the US power fail, and the technology war is likely to resume, he stresses.

The successful social platform Tiktok got into hot water when it comes to its relation with China, now the company goes international. Former Baidu communication director Kaiser Kuo looks at The Ringer how Tiktok thrived, like others, in this climate of uncertainty, fuzziness and unpredictability that is key for China’s internet.

Quality, price and value drive China’s consumers, not patriotism, says business analyst Shaun Rein in the LA Times. They might say something patriotic, but that is not key for their purchases, although China’s media might suggest nationalism is most important for consumers.

Vision, robotics and language are key areas where China is worldwide leading artificial intelligence, says Rupert Hoogewerf, chairman of the Hurun report on AI. The number of patent applications has been rising sharply over the past five years, he adds in the South China Morning Post. Huawei holds a top position.

From a cash country, where transactions were done by moving plastic bags with money between bank branches, China has turned into a leading force in fintech or financiel technology. Mobile payment are standard. Bitcoins and blockchain technology found in China early adopters. Social media have – more than anywhere in the world – adopted payment systems to facilitate online trade.

Uncertainty among China-based companies grows fast after the US blacklisted Huawei and others, and China threatens to hit back, says Shanghai-based business analyst Ben Cavender to Reuters. Panic would be an understatement.

China’s telecom giant Huawei turned on an unprecedented PR machine after it got into rough weather and even exposed its reclusive founder to foreign journalists. Too late, too little, but not untypical for most Chinese companies, even when they have global aspirations, says marketing veteran Tom Doctoroff to the Holmes Report.

While the world is still trying to come to terms with 5G and China’s position on the new technology, China itself is deploying 5G on a large scale. Andy Mok, a non-resident fellow at Center for China and Globalization explains for state-owned CGTN what the consumers might still miss on this development.