Quality, price and value drive China’s consumers, not patriotism, says business analyst Shaun Rein in the LA Times. They might say something patriotic, but that is not key for their purchases, although China’s media might suggest nationalism is most important for consumers.

Journalist Ian Johnson attended China’s National Day celebrations in Beijing and noted – apart from the military parade and obligatory propaganda, the crowd was different from earlier celebrations. “Tuesday’s crowd was different. It was made up of university professors, scientists, administrators, bureaucrats and people who had made some sort of contribution to the state. They weren’t props but excited participants who expected to remember this day,” he writes in the New York Times.

One hundred years ago students protested in Beijing for patriotism and democracy. President Xi Jinping has jumped on the centennial anniversary by praising the patriotism of the May Fourth protests. Commentator Zhang Lijia notes that he ignored that democracy was an inherent part of its legacy, she writes in the South China Morning Post.

The official trade war between the US and China seems to be entering its end game. But that does not mean the hostilities will end. Making sense out of what the world’s first and second-largest economies will do will only be slightly easier. A few speakers at our office might be able to help you out.

Trump’s trade war against China is backfiring, says financial analyst Sara Hsu at the China Focus. While ideologically the trade war makes sense, US consumers and companies pay a high price, she says.

Dolce&Gabbana was the latest fashion brand to feel the growing power of picky Chinese consumers, but it will certainly not be the last one, says consumer analyst Ben Cavender to the New York Times.  “The reality is this is probably going to kill growth for them,” he said on D&G.

Fashion brand Dolce&Gabbana got blamed for racism by its Chinese customers after using a promotional video, celebrities withdrew from a show planned for Wednesday in Shanghai and the brand withdrew its goods. The damage to the brand will be lasting, says branding expert Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to AP.

The political debate in the US has become rough, and some fear a return of McCarthyism from the 1950s when everybody linked to Russia feared prosecution. Now China too has come into the equation, and political methods move into the same direction, says China analyst Kaiser Kuo to the US World&News Report.

McDonald’s, Starbucks, KFC and Burger King are some of the American consumer brands in China who can get burned as the trade war heats up further, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, to the South China Morning Post.

Only last month the China Speakers Bureau started to make a cluster of its experts on the US-China trade war, although many did not realize that war had already been started. It did trigger off some requests from our clients.