Quality, price and value drive China’s consumers, not patriotism, says business analyst Shaun Rein in the LA Times. They might say something patriotic, but that is not key for their purchases, although China’s media might suggest nationalism is most important for consumers.

China’s consumers are changing because of the trade war and food-driven inflation, says China expert Victor Shih at the Investor Place. They will pick pork over iPhones, he says, with a drastic impact on the stock markets.

China’s internet giant Tencent has become a winner, first by copying US competitors, but now it has become their inspirator, says Tencent-watcher Matthew Brennan to Leadersleague. “WeChat does not monetize data, but it is a growth lever for other businesses in the Tencent group. It’s a bit like iOS or Android in that regard,” says Brennan.

Tencent’s WeChat released last week to manage its successful mini-programs, moving ahead with an operating system, pushing against the already embattled competitor Apple, says Tencent watcher Matthew Brennan in CNBC.  The fight focuses on China, where mini-programs are most popular.

Apple was already losing ground to domestic mobile phone makers, but the economic downturn and patriotism towards Huawei will make the US giant even more vulnerable, says business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order to the BBC.

Digital transformation is key in the planning of companies, governments and individuals, as the world is changing beyond recognition. But for the world outside China it often remains unclear how the most innovative country is going to influence their digital future. 

Speakers at the China Speakers Bureau can help you to make sense out of this often disruptive change of the world. Here we bring together a group of leading experts on China and how its digital transformation is going to change the world outside China too.

China has been reluctantly been shooting back with tariffs at US imports up to now in the Donald Trump trade war. It might be even more reluctant to use the powerful tool of its consumers in the trade war, says political analyst Victor Shih in the Financial Post. But it could, and Apple and Starbucks should prepare, says business analyst Shaun Rein on Fox News.

When brands enter China, they not only have to figure out what their demanding customers want, but also have a good look at politics, argues business analyst Shaun Rein, author of The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, in a wide-ranging interview at Knowledge CKGSB.

Self-driving cars are going to change our life beyond recognition. But there is a lot of work to be done on cybersecurity to let them drive safely, says Shanghai-based lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight.  a sector in which major car manufacturers such as Audi, Daimler, Toyota, BMW, Nissan, Volvo rub shoulders with new electric vehicle manufacturers such as Tesla and are also vying with established tech giants such as Google, Baidu, Apple, Samsung, Tencent and competing with new tech such as ride-hailing companies such as Didi and Uber?

China has become a politicized society, and countries and businesses can only ignore politics at their own peril. That is one of the key messages of political analyst Shaun Rein’s book The War for China’s Wallet: Profiting from the New World Order, and at the China Economic Review, he explains how that – in his view – works.