China’s women are no longer satisfied with the marriages they took in the past for granted, says Zhang Lijia, journalist and author of Lotus: A Novel on prostitution in China, in the South China Morning Post. “Although gradually easing, there’s still stigma attached to divorce,” she adds.Read More →

Sexual child abuse, especially those left behind by their migrant parents, needs more attention, writes author Zhang Lijia, who wrote a bestseller on prostitution in China in the South China Morning. She applauds actions taken by the Supreme People’s Court of China but sees it only as a start.Read More →

China forced global cosmetics brands to use animal tests before entering the market, but is now moving to fall in line with cruelty-free cosmetic tests, writes lawyer Mark Schaub at the China Law Insight. “For international cosmetic companies, this may make the Chinese market more attractive for cruelty-free brands. However, issues will still exist but the direction at least should be applauded,” he says.Read More →

Tech companies in China became big by asking their workers to make long hours, 996 in jargon. But those days are over says business analyst Shaun Rein to CBS. Not only is it illegal to let people work those long hours, but qualified workers also leave their jobs, because they want to have a life next to their work too.Read More →

China is overhauling its now 30-years old regulations for cosmetics, a fast-growing industry of now 260 billion Renminbi (euro 34 billion). The new rules remove some of the red tape, says lawyer Mark Schaub, but also gives the authorities more leverage over the industry, he writes at the China Law Insight.Read More →

China brought the newly adopted foreign investment law with some fanfare, but political analyst Victor Shih does not expect the law will be a game changer, as some hope, he tells at the Deutsche Welle. A level playing field for foreign and domestic companies in China might be far away.Read More →

For years the business community feared China’s central government would kill the so-called VIE’s (variable-interest entity). The tool to circumvent the country’s strict ownership regulations was never endorsed by the government but has also never been in serious trouble, tells China veteran and lawyer Mark Schaub to Bloomberg. The ban even did not show up in the draft foreign investment law, last week.Read More →

The new foreign investment law is no longer mentioning the ban on VIE’s like an earlier edition did in 2015. The tool to circumvent Chinese regulations by channeling investments through foreign tax havens is no longer needed, says financial expert Paul Gillis, a professor at Beida University. Controlling capital streamsRead More →